7 'Time Travel' Tricks That Defy Sci-Fi Folklore

You don't have to travel to the past to feel like you've gone back in time.

Have you or anyone you know traveled through time? If so, then you might want to attend Stephen Hawking's public memorial service at Westminster Abbey on June 15. 

According to Reuters, London blogger IanVisits noticed that those applying for tickets have the option to state any birthdate up to the end of 2038 — which seems right in line with Hawking's personal interests. 

During his lifetime, the British physicist spent much of his time exploring the nature of time itself. As IanVisits writes: "Professor Hawking once threw a party for time travelers, to see if any would turn up if he posted the invite after the party. None did, but it seems perfect that the memorial website allows people born in the future to attend the service. Look out for time travelers at the Abbey."

Yet, while Hawking never came in contact with any time travelers, there are still plenty of ways for people to transport themselves to the past. In a sense, anyway. While the machines of H.G. Wells' imagination might not exist, here are some ways to travel back in time without ever leaving the present:

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1. Visit your elementary school's playground.

Recess was the best part of every single school day, hands down. On the playground, you were free to run and scream the teacher dragged you back to class. Unfortunately, however, for adults, running typically applies to errands and screaming requires pillows. Well, not today. Invite some of your best pals for an organized visit to your old stomping grounds, and say hi to some of the teachers that shaped you — if any are still teaching there, that is.  

2. Watch classic television shows.

We often associate television shows with specific times in our lives. Whether it's watching The Golden Girls while sitting on your grandfather's lap, or quoting episodes of Friends in the cafeteria, these shows make you feel all warm and fuzzy inside because they remind you of times gone by. Click through to find reruns on television and binge your way to the past.

3. Listen to your favorite songs from middle school.

Certain songs evoke emotions or memories we've long repressed. However, with one note, we find ourselves in another time and place as we sing along to lyrics we thought we'd forgotten. Because our teens often influence our musical preferences the most, tap into your dusty, old CD collection for some tunes that will transport you to another era.

4. Bake chocolate chip cookies while it's raining outside.

Back in the day, rainy afternoons were all about baking and board games. The next time water falls from the sky, break out the dough and indulge yourself! And, while you wait for those fresh-baked goodies to cool, invite friends and family to play a rousing round of Candy Land or Pretty, Pretty Princess. You'll feel like a kid with no cares in the world.

5. Leave your smartphone at home for the day.

Smartphones keep us tethered to the digital world. Even when we're out and about, our attention gets redirected to the tiny box in our palms. But, if you "lose" your smartphone for even just one day, you'll have the opportunity to remember what life was like before people could reach you anywhere at any time. Freedom!

6. Browse through the children's department at your local library.

Books are portals to the past in their own right, but sifting through the kids' books at the library where you used to borrow the items on your summer reading list will make you feel like an 8-year-old all over again. Browse the shelves to find the books you'll always remember, and rediscover those you've forgotten, for a nostalgic blast from the past.

7. Walk around your old neighborhood.

Simply walking around outside will allow you to reconnect with nature, which represents a simpler time. Remember when you actually paid attention to the sounds of birds chirping and bees buzzing? Allowing yourself to be present in the moment will surely give you flashbacks to the past.

Cover image via Sam Mgrdichian / Unsplash

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