This Photo Shows How A Mother's Breast Milk Can Transform To Accommodate The Needs Of A Baby

"Top milk is from 3 days ago when a healthy Elliot was nursing ... Bottom is from today."

Mothers who choose to breastfeed will be happy to know there are many health benefits to the practice for themselves and the baby. For example, nursing stimulates the production of oxytocin, which helps shrink the uterus back to its pre-pregnancy size. Plus, it also promotes positive associations with nursing, improving bonding with the baby.

But one of the more incredible aspects of breastmilk is that it is"dynamic" and can actually change depending on if a baby is sick or has an infection. This was recently illustrated in a Facebook post by mom Ashlee Chase.

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The mom from Newtown, PA, posted the photo in response to people who questioned why she still breastfeeds her daughter at 7 months old. She included a photo of two bags of breast milk from different days. She wrote, "Top milk is from three days ago when a healthy Elliot was nursing. Bottom is from today, after sick Elliot, with a fever comfort, nursed all night."

"When either a breastfeeding baby or a breastfeeding mother becomes ill, the percentage of infection-fighting white blood cells found in the breast milk increases up to 94 percent, more closely resembling the white blood cell composition found in colostrum [ the 'super milk' rich in antibodies and leukocytes/infection-fighting white blood cells the body makes the first few days after birth]," Jamil Abdur-Rahman, M.D., board-certified ob/gyn and Chairman of Obstetrics and Gynecology explained to SELF.

Abdur-Rahman also explained the milk's change in color. "Whenever any fluid from the body contains a large amount of infection-fighting white blood cells or antibodies, it will assume a yellowish color that is very similar to what many people would call 'pus.'"

Commenters were awestruck by how the milk adapted to suit Elliot's needs.

One wrote, "It never fails to blow my mind how incredible the human body is."

Another said, "Such a cool visual representation of what happens."

One Facebook commenter summed it up. "A mother's body knows what's best for her offspring. Period."

(H/T: Popsugar)

Cover image via  Paradee Siriboon I Shutterstock

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