Internet Praises 7-Year-Old Who Was The Sole Student To Walkout Of Her Elementary School

“You are never too little to make a difference."

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As students across the country held their second major school walkout of the year, one first grader is proving that you're never too young to stand up for what you believe. Havana Chapman-Edwards was the only student at her elementary school to walk out of class Friday and commemorated the moment by posting a photo of herself outside her school in Alexandria, Va. Thousands have since liked and shared the photo and voiced their support for the young activist.

When her daughter's elementary school didn't have any plans for the walkout, Bethany Edwards checked seven-year-old Havana out of school so she could still participate, the mom told CNN. While initially upset that no one else left with her, Havana captioned her photo, "I am all alone at my school, but I know I am not alone."

"I didn't understand why they didn't care," Havana told Teen Vogue of her other classmates. "I tried to tell them to come, but they said no."

Havana wore her orange spacesuit that day because she wanted to honor victims of gun violence by wearing orange but also show that "little black girls have dreams and aspirations and they are strong and beautiful and deserve the same chance to achieve their goals as everyone else," her mom explained. 

"You are never too little to make a difference," Havana said. "I know that just because I am only seven doesn't mean that I can't help other people every day."

The now-viral photo of Havana outside her school has led many to take to social media to voice their support for her actions. 

Students across the country walked out on the anniversary of the Columbine school shooting to call for reforms to gun laws. Demonstrators were also silent for 13 seconds to honor the 13 students who were killed at the school 19 years ago. After honoring the students, Havana and her mother watched TV coverage of the walkouts at other schools. 

"She said, 'I am going to tell my friends I did this, and then next time there will be more of us. That means we are winning,'" Edwards said. "I knew then that she understood what it means to be a leader, even in the most simple terms."

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