The Trailer For Mister Rogers’ Documentary Reminds Us Of 5 Impactful Lessons He Taught Us

“Won’t You Be My Neighbor?” is in theaters June 8.

For years, Fred Rogers taught us invaluable life lessons we still remember to this day. And now, one documentary will highlight the man's legacy, focusing on how he crafted Mister Rogers' Neighborhood as well as those people that were so beautifully impacted by the show.

The documentary, appropriately titled Won't You Be My Neighbor? is "a portrait of a man whom we all think we know," the trailer's description on YouTube reads. "This emotional and moving film takes us beyond the zip-up cardigans and The Land of Make Believe, and into the heart of a creative genius who inspired generations of children with compassion and limitless imagination."

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The trailer, which shows original footage from Rogers' show, behind-the-scenes action, and interviews from producers and guests, includes a statement from its producer, Margy Whitmer: "If you take all of the elements that make good television and do the exact opposite, you have Mister Rogers' Neighborhood: low production values, simple set, unlikely star. Yet it worked."

The trailer also points out the various topics that the show handled: divorce, death and assassination, and race, to name a few. 

"I suppose it's an invitation," Rogers says in a piece of the footage. "It's an invitation for somebody to be close to you. The greatest thing that we can do is to help somebody know that they're loved and capable of loving."

So as we wait anxiously for the upcoming documentary's release, which is set to come to select theaters on June 8, we've rounded up five quotes from both Rogers and those he worked with that helped make us better people. 

Check it all out below:

1. On appreciating the people around us.

"All of us have special ones who have loved us into being. Would you just take, along with me, 10 seconds to think of the people who have helped you become who you are? Those who have cared about you and wanted what was best for you in life. Ten seconds of silence. I'll watch the time," Rogers said to the audience as he accepted the Lifetime Achievement Award at the 24th Annual Daytime Emmy Awards.

2. On talking about our feelings.

"Anything that's human is mentionable, and anything that is mentionable can be more manageable. When we talk about our feelings, they become less overwhelming, less upsetting and less scary. The people we trust with that important talk can help us know that we're not alone," Rogers writes in Life's Journeys According to Mister Rogers: Things to Remember Along the Way

3. On friendship and race.

"They didn't want Black people to come and swim in their swimming pools. My being on the program was a statement for Fred," Francois Clemmons, who played Officer Clemmons, says in the trailer for Won't You Be My Neighbor? 

According to NPR, "Clemmons joined the cast of the show in 1968, becoming the first African-American to have a recurring role on a kids TV series."

During one appearance on the show, Rogers invited Clemmons to share space in a plastic pool on set. Footage from the show shows the two taking off their shoes and putting their feet in the water. 

"He invited me to come over and to rest my feet in the water with him," Clemmons tells NPR. "The icon Fred Rogers not only was showing my brown skin in the tub with his white skin as two friends, but as I was getting out of that tub, he was helping me dry my feet."

4. On dealing with "scary things."

"When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, 'Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping,'" Rogers said

5. On love.

"Love isn't a state of perfect caring. It is an active noun like 'struggle.' To love someone is to strive to accept that person exactly the way he or she is, right here and now," Rogers said

You can watch the trailer for "Won’t You Be My Neighbor?" below:

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