A World Cup Trophy Wasn’t The Only Thing A 5-Year-Old Got After His Battle With Cancer

"'England' and 'Harry Kane' are some of the first words he learned to say again ..."

Countries from across the world might be competing for the World Cup, but the championship has already gained one winner — Ben Williams. 

Ben, a 5-year-old boy from England, received a replica of the trophy on July 5 from the staff at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham after he completed six weeks of radiotherapy, also known as radiation therapy, to get rid of a brain tumor. 

Although the brain tumor originally left him unable to speak or walk, Ben is now able to do both. 

Sam Williams, Ben's father, told The Independent that the reason the staff at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital got him the World Cup replica was because Ben is a huge fan of the English team. He even asked for the World Cup a few weeks ago, according to Liam Herbert, a specialist pediatric radiographer at the hospital.

"He really liked football before he got ill and has suddenly gone England crazy in the last couple of weeks, so much so that 'England' and 'Harry Kane' are some of the first words he learned to say again as his speech came back," Williams said.

Ben's love for soccer is also so intense that when his parents got him an England jersey, he's refused to take it off since.

"We've resorted to washing it overnight while he's been in bed," Williams said

Ben’s story made the rounds on Twitter, where people have been tweeting their support for him by responding to the video Herbert posted and using #BensWorldCup.

It's even caught the attention of Harry Kane, a player on the English World Cup team who promised that he and his team would do their best to win against Sweden when they competed with them on July 7.

Ben's excitement has surely grown as England has now reached the semifinals and will play against Croatia this Wednesday.

Cover image: fifg / Shutterstock.com

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