Amazing Photographs Look Like This Yosemite Waterfall Is Made Of Fire

Firefall.

Yosemite National Park is a gorgeous place to visit any time of year, but there's one gorgeous phenomenon that can only be seen during a small window in February: the Horsetail Falls set on fire.

Well, not literally. 

This phenomenon occurs when the distance from the sun, the amount of snowpack on El Capitan, the light filtering through the atmosphere, and the photographer's vantage point all come together to create this incredible illusion. The deep orange color of the setting sun reflects off of the water and surrounding spray, giving it a red-hot appearance dubbed a "firefall."

Because so many factors come into play with this occurrence, it doesn't always happen. This rarity makes it all the more special.

"This is the first time in 5 years that I have been trying to get this shot, that all the elements worked out," photographer Sapna Reddy captioned on her Instagram post. "Its not a shot that requires much physical exertion or technical expertise. But when all the elements of nature come together for the "Fire Falls" show its definitely worth photographing."

Photographers came out in droves in hopes of seeing the burning waterfall, which only lasts for a few minutes.

"The place was absolutely packed for this rare show, but I found a tiny opening and wedged myself between a photographer and a tourist," photographer Jeffrey Plui commented on Instagram. "Squatting on wet, slippery ice with the photographer's backside a few inches from my grill, I managed to get this shot of Firefall at its peak glow."

Here are some of the most amazing shots of the firefall photographers have shared with the public from this incredible event:

"I Lava You" - Horsetail Fall, Yosemite National Park, CA. Each year during the second half of February, if there's enough snowpack atop El Capitan, if the temperature's warm enough to produce enough snowmelt, if the western skies are clear, and if the setting sun hits the water and spray at just the right angle, the natural phenomenon of Firefall occurs. We arrived at the park late in the afternoon this past Saturday and found a parking spot along Southside Dr. halfway between Cathedral and Sentinel beaches just as the orange glow was beginning. The place was absolutely packed for this rare show, but I found a tiny opening and wedged myself between a photographer and a tourist. Squatting on wet, slippery ice with the photographer's backside a few inches from my grill, I managed to get this shot of Firefall at its peak glow. ______________________________ Nikon D7100, Nikon 28-300. 125mm, f/14, 1/5 sec, ISO 100. Lightroom & IG. ______________________________ #firefall #yosemitenationalpark #yosemite_national_park #yosemitenation #findyourpark #nationalparkgeek #horsetailfalls #wildcalifornia ​​#rawcalifornia #visitcalifornia #californiaholics​ #ignorcal #westcoast_exposures #ig_waterfalls #hotshotz_water #aqua_gallery​ ​#water_brilliance #water_perfection #igworldclub_h2o #exclusive_water #water_shots #water_captures #ig_northamerica #igs_america #ig_all_americas #bw_beautifulworld #just_unitedstates #ic_february #multi_180216

A photo posted by Jeff (@jeffreyplui) on

They say a picture is worth a thousand words, and when it comes to these shots, all of them are, "wow!"

(H/T: Epoch Times)