Three Women Are Taking The Fight To ISIS' Doorstep

A true story of bravery.

For an ISIS jihadi, one of their greatest fears is being killed by a woman, which would mean being denied "Jannah," or life in paradise after death.

So you might as well call these women ISIS' worst nightmare. 

Raparin, Roza and Deijly came to Mount Sinjar to help slow the Yazidi genocide that prompted President Barack Obama to level air strikes against ISIS back in August. But according to the three female soldiers, who spoke to MailOnline, those airstrikes came too late. Four days before the airstrikes, ISIS had already "massacred Yazidis." 

"People were exaggerating before they met them," one solider says in the video below. "Even the big countries were not able to fight and beat them, that's what we were told. When we came here we saw with our own eyes that's not true."

The three women left behind lives in Turkey in order to come to Kurdistan and seek revenge. According to reports, there were days when the women were killing 10 ISIS soldiers a day in northern Iraq with AK-47s. 

ISIS had arrived in villages to slaughter men who wouldn't denounce their religions and convert to Islam, and then, in some cases, would take the women as sex slaves, according to one of the soldiers. 

They aren't the only women taking the fight to ISIS.

The three women above are actually members of the PKK, the Kurdistan Workers Party, that has been designated as a terrorist organization by the United States, NATO, and Turkey for its battle against the Turkish government. That designation is why they have kept themselves relatively anonymous, compared to the Women's Defense Units (YPJ), a Kurdish all-women's defense unit that has done battle with ISIS and is doing their best to keep them out of Kurdish areas in Syria and northern Iraq. Both have ties to the PKK, but the YPJ has been more readily covered by mainstream media.

In April, 18-year-old Zilan Orkesh told TIME that she began cheering after her first ISIS kill. 

"I wanted to let them know that their worst nightmare had come true," she said. "Their friend had been killed by a woman."

The unit of three has also claimed that ISIS fighters take drugs in order to get up the courage to fight them, something they discovered after searching the fighters post-combat. 

Here is one of the women discussing their battle: