20 Confessions From People Who Don't Leave Tips At Restaurants

"I'm a bad tipper unless they did a really good job ... "

Anyone who's waited tables or tending bar in the United States knows just how much tips matter.  The U.S. Department of Labor mandates that "An employer of a tipped employee is only required to pay $2.13 per hour in direct wages if that amount combined with the tips received at least equals the federal minimum wage. If the employee’s tips combined with the employer’s direct wages of at least $2.13 per hour do not equal the federal minimum hourly wage, the employer must make up the difference."

Federal minimum wage is $7.25 an hour. 

Obviously, there's plenty that can influence one's tips. Servers stuck working a historically slow shift are going to be making less in tips than their colleagues on much busier shifts. Tables that don't turn quickly can also put a damper on how much you can expect to make. 

While there are many variables that can affect the amount of money someone waiting tables can make at any given time, there are none that are quite as frustrating as people who, for whatever reasons or justifications, simply choose not to tip.

In the interest of social survey, we're pleased to share the justifications offered by 20 non-tippers who gave their reasons for stiffing their servers to Whisper, an app, an online platform where people can anonymously confess things that they might otherwise not talk about.

There are better arguments to made for not tipping. Employer responsibility and accountability to living wage realities and the European model are all compelling additions to the conversation.

Whether you agree with their reasons or not, it's an interesting look into the mindset of the people who might very well be sitting at the table next to you.

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Do you know anyone like this? How much do you usually tip at restaurants and bars? Lets us know in the comments below and tag your friends.