29 People Face Their Insecurities Head On, Show There's Hope For Us All

"I am not ..."

Twelve years ago, photographer Steve Rosenfield wasn't happy. 

He worked a 9-to-5 job and couldn't build relationships with others, in part, because he was too insecure to let them in. So in 2002, he quit, dropped everything and traveled the word, and gained a new mindset in the process: no more judgements. 

"I tried to have no judgements towards the people I was meeting and saw no 'flaws' because I had made myself aware of the fact that we all struggle, we all have our 'flaws,' and we all have our insecurities," he wrote on his blog.

With a fresh perspective on others, and himself, he decided to start a social experiment, which then turned into a national project. Inspired by the song about acceptance, "What I Be," Rosenfield began the project, using his friend's insecurity first:

"I wrote 'thunder thighs' on Amanda's hand, alongside the photograph she came up with the statement, 'I am not my body image.' And thus, the "What I Be" project was made."

He then began traveling, finding subjects of all walks of life and having them display their insecurities and then immediately shut them down starting with three words "I am not ..."

"In today's society, we are often told to look or act a certain way. If we differ from these 'standards,' we are often judged, ridiculed, bullied and sometimes even killed over them," he wrote. "I started this project in hopes to open up the lines of communication, and to help everyone accept diversity with an open mind & heart and empower those who feel they suffer for something they may see as a flaw."

What's yours?

“I am not my decisions.”

“I am not my ability.”

“I am not my commitments.”

“I am not my clothing.”

“I am not my casting.”

“I am not my accident.”

“I am not my aging.”

“I am not my weight.”

“I am not my reduction.”

“I am not my height.”

“I am not my measurements.”

“I am not my shoe size.”

“I am not my weave.”

“I am not my scars.”

“I am not my GPA."

“I am not my femininity.”

“I am not my stomach.”

“I am not my panic attacks.”

“I am not my sexual assault.”

“I am not my past.”

“I am not my history.”

“I am not my addiction.”

“I am not my identity.”

“I am not my masculinity.”

“I am not my chromosomes.”

“I am not my doubt.”

“I am not my depression.”

“I am not my turban.”

“I am not my number.”