Planned Parenthood Victims' Stories Are Coming To Light, And They're Amazing

They lost their lives but we can honor who they were.

Ke'Arre Stewart had bullets in his body, but the Iraq War veteran still had one last good deed to do: warn others of a shooter coming.

The 29-year-old father of two was outside a Colorado Springs Planned Parenthood to get better cell service when he was shot by the gunman that Friday. Stewart, who there accompanying a friend, managed to rush back inside and warn others of the shooter even after suffering what would be fatal injuries. 

"I believe that's his military instinct, you know: Leave no soldier behind, leave no civilian behind, just leave no one behind," Stewart's brother Leyonte Chandler told ABC News. "So he ran back inside, trying to help out others. I don't know where he was at, as far as how many more breaths he had, but he knew. And before his time ran out I guess that was his main priority ... to help and save other lives."

Chandler says that thanks to Stewart's warning, people started hiding in bathrooms and taking cover.

"He was just a standup guy, he would take a bullet for you," Amburh Butler, a lifelong friend, told the Associated Press. "He was the most sincere person I'd ever met."

Like Stewart, Jennifer Markovsky, 35, was also accompanying a friend to the clinic when she was fatally shot by the gunman. She, too, had children. 

The devoted mother and wife moved from Hawaii to Colorado with her husband to be with him while he was stationed there for military service. Family members told The Denver Post that she was a stay-at-home mom who lived for her young son and daughter.

She "was the most lovable person," her father, John Ah-King told The Denver Post. "So kindhearted, just always there when I needed her."

Garret Swasey was the only police officer killed during the shooting, and his legacy will be one of heart and valor. 

The 44-year-old was a husband, a father of two, and a pastor. At one time, he was a competitive figure skater who trained with the world-famous Nancy Kerrigan.

"The way he treated me but also the way he treated my family and his wife and his children, he was just such a gentle and caring individual," one of the congregants from Swasey's church told Fox News. "And yet you knew behind that was such a strong warrior who would give his life and defend life to the best of his ability."

Swasey had been a police officer for just six years before his death last week.