These Glasses Have 'Liquid Lenses' And Will Automatically Focus Whatever You're Looking At

Get the clearest vision possible.

Are you a glasses-wearer who switches between multiple frames depending on what you're looking at? Or are you someone who wears progressive lenses and knows some things are never quite as clear as they should be? If you've answered yes to either, a new invention on the horizon may be right for you.

A group of computer and electrical engineers at the University of Utah, led by professor Carlos Mastrangelo and doctoral student Nazmul Hasan, have developed a pair of "smart glasses" with special liquid lenses. 



Courtesy of C. H. Mastrangelo and N. Hasan, ECE Dept, University of Utah and Dan Hixson/University of Utah College of Engineering
Courtesy of C. H. Mastrangelo and N. Hasan, ECE Dept, University of Utah and Dan Hixson/University of Utah College of Engineering

The "smart glasses" automatically adjust to whatever a person is looking at, whether it's close or far away.

Courtesy of C. H. Mastrangelo and N. Hasan, ECE Dept, University of Utah and Dan Hixson/University of Utah College of Engineering
Courtesy of C. H. Mastrangelo and N. Hasan, ECE Dept, University of Utah and Dan Hixson/University of Utah College of Engineering

When a person gets the glasses, they can enter their prescription via a smartphone app. Bluetooth technology will then use the information to adjust the glasses to the wearer. This technology also means users don't have to get new lenses each time their prescription changes. They can simply update their prescription through the app.

As if that weren't enough, the lenses are made out of glycerin, a thick colorless liquid, surrounded by flexible rubber-like membranes in the front and back. The back membrane in each lens is connected to different mechanical actuators that push the membrane back and forth. University of Utah's UNews reports that the glasses also have a distance meter on the bridge of the nose that measures an object's distance using pulses of infrared light. Using this information, the lenses can adjust to make any object clearer.

The actuators are run by battery power that's in the specially designed frames. The rechargeable battery can reportedly last more than 24 hours between each charge.

The lenses can change focus from one object to another in only 14 milliseconds.

Courtesy of C. H. Mastrangelo and N. Hasan, ECE Dept, University of Utah and Dan Hixson/University of Utah College of Engineering
Courtesy of C. H. Mastrangelo and N. Hasan, ECE Dept, University of Utah and Dan Hixson/University of Utah College of Engineering

A rough prototype was recently shown at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas and the team is currently working on making the product lighter and more streamlined. The company Sharpeyes LLC has been created to commercialize the glasses and the team hopes they will be available to the public within three years.

Phys.org reported that Mastrangelo said of the glasses, "Most people who get reading glasses have to put them on and take them off all the time. You don't have to do that anymore. You put these on, and it's always clear."

Check out the video below to find out more about the "smart glasses:"

(H/T: Mashable)

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