This Is The Ideal Age To Get Married, Research Says

Thanks, science.

If you're in your late twenties and still single, there's no actual reason to be worried about it. Not even a slight bit. Simply because, according to science, the ideal age to get hitched is still ahead of you.

Despite what Bridget Jones' parents might have thought, 32 isn't too late to get married.

In fact, 32 is the ideal age. Or so this research claims.

Apparently, each additional year of not being married before the age of 32 is a good thing. And there's data to prove it.

Nicholas Wolfinger, a sociologist at the University of Utah, has analyzed data from the National Survey of Families and Households, which led to some pretty interesting findings.

"It's no mystery why people who marry as teens face a high risk of divorce. Just recall your high school boyfriend or girlfriend," he explains on the Institute For Family Studies blog. "Along with the exhilaration of first love often came jealousy, insecurity, pressure from parents or friends, and tearful doubts about the future. Now imagine getting married under the same conditions. Scholars have long known that youthful marriage is a strong predictor of divorce."

To start with, people who wed at the age of 25 are half as likely to get a divorce in comparison to people who get married at 20.

Wolfinger's research suggests that till the age of 32, each year of age at marriage reduces the odds of divorce by 11 percent.

But if creating a family is the path you actually want to choose, perhaps you shouldn't wait forever...

Past the age of 32, the odds of divorce increase by 5 percent every year, the study claims.

Statistically, your marriage has the greatest chance of lasting if you get married at the age of 32. Not earlier, not later.

"The kinds of people who wait till their thirties to get married may be the kinds of people who aren't predisposed toward doing well in their marriages," Wolfinger argues in his research. "Maybe some of the thirty-somethings who would have made good spouses now feel perfectly comfortable being single, or living with partners out of wedlock."

Kind of makes sense. And yet again it's important to remember that this is just statistics. Everyone is different, and you are you.