What Snake Venom Does To Blood Will Send Chills Up Your Spine And Down

Ew.

We all know that snake venom can be poisonous. But does it look like when it gets into the human bloodstream? The science of it is actually pretty cool.

National Geographic explains that venom has the capability to "stop a body in its tracks." Toxic proteins and peptides target both the nervous system and the body's molecules until nerves, muscles, cells, and tissues are no longer functioning properly.  "Venom can kill by clotting blood and stopping the heart or by preventing clotting and triggering a killer bleed," author Jennifer S. Holland wrote for the publication in 2013.

And in a video gone viral around the Internet, we get a look at just what happens when a particular snake's venom gets mixed around with blood (and it's not pretty)...

The venom is extracted from the snakes bite and then dropped into a glass...

And when the blood and the venom are mixed...

It's shiver-inducing. Watch the full video below:

But all snake venom isn't entirely bad, if used for the right reasons. Research suggests that the venom can actually be used as a medical ailment for patients experiencing a variety of different sicknesses and conditions.

In 2013, Gillian Mohney reported on "Toxic Medicine: How Venom Can Heal," for ABC News. In her article, she explains that new research shows how the proteins and toxins in venom have the potential to help treat "ailments, including autoimmune disease, stroke and multiple sclerosis."

Moreover, according to Medical Daily, "Hemotoxins in snake venom target the circulatory system, and typically attack the body's clotting ability and muscles. But scientists have also found ways to use hemotoxins for medicine — such as treating heart attacks and blood disorders."

Through further science and research, perhaps more and more people can be helped, professionally, using snake venom. But, of course, let's not make friends with them out in the wild.  They've still got a bite that kills.