For Their Senior Project, These Guys Built A Tiny House That Anyone Would Want To Live In

Maple floors and a sleeping loft? Check.

Archer Willauer (left) and Brett Weinstein.
Archer Willauer (left) and Brett Weinstein. Archer Willauer

Archer Willauer and Brett Weinstein just graduated from Severn School in Severna Park, Maryland, but they've definitely made their mark there. The two young men took it upon themselves to build a tiny house after being selected for the Severn Fellows program, which invites select seniors to "transcend the academic program and develop a year-long intellectual pursuit that reflects their growing passions."

The program is interesting in that although students make a substantial commitment of time and energy, they receive neither a grade nor academic credit: the reward is in seeing the project to completion.

Until taking on the project, neither of the two had any construction experience. We had the opportunity to see Willauer and Weinstein's presentation on the project. Here's what we learned.

The tiny house was designed by the two young men and was partially inspired by Frank Lloyd Wright.

Weinstein used Google SketchUp to create a CAD model of the house to better visualize the interior layout. The two then created cardboard models to scale, along with various blueprints for the final design.

Archer Willauer and Brett Weinstein
Archer Willauer and Brett Weinstein
Archer Willauer and Brett Weinstein
Archer Willauer and Brett Weinstein
Archer Willauer and Brett Weinstein
Archer Willauer and Brett Weinstein

The house was built on a 6' x 16' flat bed trailer that they found on Craigslist.

Archer Willauer and Brett Weinstein
Archer Willauer and Brett Weinstein

The two seniors worked with materials donated by the community.

Archer Willauer and Brett Weinstein
Archer Willauer and Brett Weinstein
Archer Willauer and Brett Weinstein

Due to safety and liability reasons, the boys were required to have older adult supervision during the use of power tools. This meant that they could usually only work after school or on weekends. Despite the restrictions imposed by that requirement, they quickly picked up the necessary construction skills. 

Willauer and Weinstein learned everything from framing to roofing.

Archer Willauer and Brett Weinstein
Archer Willauer and Brett Weinstein

Friends and relatives also assisted when they could.

Archer Willauer
Archer Willauer

Once the outside was completed work began on the interior.

Archer Willauer 
Archer Willauer 
Archer Willauer 
Archer Willauer 

The floors are made of donated light and dark-stained maple, adding a touch of elegance.

Archer Willauer and Brett Weinstein
Archer Willauer and Brett Weinstein
Archer Willauer 
Archer Willauer 

Time constraints prevented the installation of electricity or plumbing, but the house has a dedicated kitchen and bathroom space.

Archer Willauer and Brett Weinstein
Archer Willauer and Brett Weinstein

The loft sleeping area is accessed via a ladder that can be raised and put away via a pulley system.

Archer Willauer and Brett Weinstein
Archer Willauer and Brett Weinstein

After completing work on the house, Willauer towed it to the front of the school for their presentation.

Archer Willauer 
Archer Willauer 

The tiny housewarming was a hit.

Archer Willauer
Archer Willauer
Archer Willauer 
Archer Willauer 

Archer Willauer and Brett Weinstein will be attending The University of Virginia and Emory University respectively this fall. 

Thanks to Archer Willauer and Brett Weinstein for the use of the photographs.