This Woman Did Two Things To Ensure A Long Life

Think of this as the fountain of youth.

Emma Morano lives alone in a two-room apartment in Verbania, Italy. Her niece, Rosemarie, is her caregiver and if she ever gets sick, her doctor, Dr. Carlo Bava, makes house calls.

According to The New York Times, Dr. Bava said, "She's aware of the privilege of living."

At 115 years old, Ms. Morano is the oldest person in Europe. She's the fifth oldest person on Earth. In an interview with The New York Times, Morano shared her secrets for longevity: raw eggs — and staying single.

That's right, staying single. As in NO MAN.

Which is good news for all the...

SINGLE LADIES!!!!!!!

Morano has been single since 1938. She was once unhappily married, but the marriage ended after the death of her infant son.

But she didn't spend the past eight decades sitting at home eating Ben & Jerry's. She told The NYT that she's had plenty of suitors in her lifetime but never wanted to settle down. "I didn't want to be dominated by anyone," she said.

Morano's theory might be hard to believe considering the pressure society places on women to find a life partner. But perhaps her lifestyle really is conducive to a long, stimulating life. 

According to an article in Psychology Today, singles tend to have less, but better, sex. "Statistics show that singles have a better time in the bedroom, though intimacy occurs only about half as frequently," the article explained. "Hormone levels are higher in a 'courting relationship.'" 

Meanwhile, Eric Kinenberg, a sociologist and author of a book about the benefits of living alone called "Going Solo,"  told The New York Times: "A bad marriage can make a person feel more isolated than being single."

So, ladies, if no man seems worthy, don't settle. Take a lesson from Ms. Morano's playbook. After all, she's been around a lot longer than you have.

And now here's a fun montage of the oldest women in the world:

Be sure to share this with all your single friends out there. Click below now.