Artist Creates Dynamic, Environmentally Friendly Animal Sculptures Using Recycled Materials

One person's trash is another person's art.

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Artist Sayaka Ganz describes her style as "3D Impressionism."

"I use plastic objects like brush strokes in a painting by Van Gogh," she writes on Bored Panda.

Ganz creates stunning sculptures depicting animals in motion, and she does it using recycled objects such as kitchen utensils. She collects these used items from thrift stores and acquaintances.

"I want to share the imagination of what it might feel like to gallop like a horse and feel the wind going through my mane," she writes, "or to swim like a dolphin and feel the water and sunlight against my fins."

She's definitely achieved that.

Sayaka Ganz
Sayaka Ganz

The movement Ganz is able to capture in her work is impressive for any medium, but especially when you consider how often we toss these items aside without a second thought as to their artistic potential.

On her website, Ganz explains the environmentally conscious philosophy behind her art. She believes in reducing waste by showing the beauty in everyday objects. "When we think of these things as beautiful, we value them," she says. "If we value our resources we will waste less."

Sayaka Ganz
Sayaka Ganz

That Ganz has chosen animals as the subject of her work only adds to this message. When you see what many consider to be trash juxtaposed against the graceful form of a dolphin, you may think twice about what you throw in the garbage.

"One of the important tasks for artists of our time is to bring more of the natural world back into people's lives, especially in urban areas," Ganz writes in her artist statement.

Sayaka Ganz
Sayaka Ganz

Before starting a sculpture, Ganz researches the movement of the animal she has chosen to depict, looking at reference photos and examining the poses from different angles. She treats arranging the plastic objects like a puzzle, adding and taking away until she is satisfied.

Watch a video of Ganz's fascinating process below:

You can see more of Ganz's art on her website and Facebook.

(H/T: Bored Panda)