RBG Wrote To The 8-Year-Old Who Dressed As Her For Superhero Day

Justice Ginsburg is a superhero to all of us.

RBG Wrote To The 8-Year-Old Who Dressed As Her For Superhero Day

8-year-old Michele Threefoot captivated the internet in December when her mom, Krista Threefoot, posted a photo her dressed as Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg for her school's Superhero Day on Facebook. "Michele has been reading the heck out of I Dissent," Threefoot wrote on her Facebook post, referencing the picture book about the storied Supreme Court justice's life, "and decided to dress as Ruth Bader Ginsburg, because she fights prejudice and injustice. Girls who read really are dangerous, to unfairness and outmoded inequalities."

The photo gained Michele viral fame and Threefoot many admirers for her parenting skills, and as it circled around the web, Justice Ginsburg's people caught wind of it. Shortly after, Threefoot received an email from one of Ginsburg's assistants. 

"She said that several people had brought the picture to her attention, and that she showed it to Justice Ginsburg, who thought it was great," Threefoot told A Plus. 

On Jan. 6, Ginsburg's letter was delivered to Michele's home.



Courtesy Krista Threefoot
Courtesy Krista Threefoot

Justice Ginsburg's letter read:

Dear Michele, you look just like me! May you continue to thrive on reading and learning. Every good wish, Ruth Bader Ginsburg. 
Courtesy Krista Threefoot
Courtesy Krista Threefoot

Threefoot described Michele as "so excited" to receive Ginsburg's letter. "Her favorite part was that Justice Ginsburg said she looked just like her," she said, adding that Michele wrote a thank you note on Sunday telling Ginsburg how special her letter was. "I will keep it forever," the note read. "I promise to keep reading and learning."

Jody McKinley; Courtesy Krista Threefoot
Jody McKinley; Courtesy Krista Threefoot

Threefoot previously told A Plus that Michele and her sister are also big fans of another woman who came up in a time of rampant sexism, Hillary Clinton.

Courtesy Krista Threefoot
Courtesy Krista Threefoot

Explaining why having powerful female role models is crucial in shaping the way they think about themselves, Threefoot recalled when her a boy in her younger daughter's preschool class told her that blue, her favorite color, was "only for boys." Despite Threefoot's efforts at dispelling that claim, since then, her daughter's favorite color has been pink instead, up until recently.

"I think girls need to know that there is nothing they can't do. No matter how much parents try to teach them that boys and girls can do and like the same things, they still get the message that there are certain expectations for girls and for boys," Threefoot said, driving home the lesson of society's gender conditioning.



Jody McKinley; Courtesy Krista Threefoot
Jody McKinley; Courtesy Krista Threefoot

"But when powerful women break those stereotypes in a highly visible way, kids get a different message. Boys and girls alike need to know that there is absolutely no reason why women and girls can't be powerful leaders."

Cover image via Jody McKinley/Krista Threefoot

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