Reporter Gets Sexually Harassed On Live TV, While Reporting On Sexual Harassment In Moment Of Sad Irony

Oy.

Last week, BBC TV reporter Sarah Teale was reporting outside a conference in Nottingham, England on a very serious topic — sexual harassment. 

She says: "An online study showed that a shocking 95 percent of people said they had been harassed, jeered at or had obscenities shouted at them in the street, and a large proportion said they'd also been groped or grabbed inappropriately in public." 

Just as she finishes her statement, a man walks by and yells sexual obscenities at her, proving Teale's point in a moment of sad irony. 

The reporter told the BBC that the scenario "genuinely shocked" her, and in response to people thinking the event was staged, or was part of a recent trend where passersby shout obscenities on live television, she said, "It's fairly obvious from my reaction that it wasn't staged. If it is a craze it doesn't make it any less offensive."

In a Tweet she simply writes "Irony." 

Of course gender-based street harassment is a serious issue, and is often experienced by females throughout their lives from the time they hit puberty. 

Fortunately, there are many campaigns and resources to help spread awareness about the issue, and work toward ending harassment globally. Nonprofit organization Stop Street Harassment names just a few, such as Hollaback!, Women in Cities International and Men Stopping Violence.  To check out more organizations working to fight street harassment, visit here. 

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