Reddit's News Site "Upvoted" To Compile The Best Stories From Its Service

Ironically, it won't allow actual upvoting.

Reddit brands itself as the "front page of the Internet," and in many ways that's very true. Millions of users go to the service to share stories, weeding out the good and surfacing the bad through a system of upvoting and commenting, as well as seemingly countless subreddits dedicated to specific topics. Now Reddit has launched a publication called Upvoted to curate its best stories and give credit where it's due.

Because Reddit has had problems with its massive and fiesty community, from a business standpoint the company has suffered — it's hard to please all of its users who are used to a relatively free environment, and it's hard to improve upon the completely unattractive landscape for advertisers. Redditors don't take well to any content that's spammy or branded in any way.

Upvoted aims to tackle these issues by having an in-house editorial team of about 10 people go out and find interesting stories all over Reddit, verify the details, interview their posters, and package everything in a visually pleasing and easily-digestible way. Its site, Upvoted.com, is already live and functions much like a regular publication. There are verticals, stories, images, and a clean interface allowing visitors to quickly consume the latest and greatest in content that spawned on Reddit.

Notably, the site itself doesn't allow for the same upvoting and commenting that drove the company to massive initial success, but it does link interested readers back to Reddit comment threads if they'd like to discuss a story. In general, it's a solid way to surface unique stories tucked away on hidden subreddits or split across various posts, and it makes sure to give proper attribution to whichever Reddit users were responsible for initially creating and/or discovering the content.

Most importantly, Upvoted clearly combats the tendency of other publishers and aggregators who yank stories from Reddit to get their own clicks, often with little or no attribution. With the Internet all too easy of an environment for stolen content to pose as real, it's a smart play on multiple fronts.

Cover image: Flickr