Singers Perform In The Subway, Receive A Note Worth More Than Money

A beautiful story.

Subway performers often go ignored. As busy commuters pass by, rushing to get from one place to the next, subway performers sing, dance, and play instruments in the background.

But some people stop to listen, and it's a beautiful thing.

Opera Collective, a group of musicians who aim to "make opera accessible to the general public," is based in New York City, and considers the subway a perfect place to share their talents with the public.

On Monday night, Opera Collective headed into the Union Square stop in New York City.

"I recall all three of us performing our strongest repertoire... and there were times during our stay there that we had quite a crowd," Alexis Cregger, an Opera Collective performer, told Upworthy

After their performance, the group saw a young woman leave a note in their tip bucket.

It read:

"I sat and listened to you 3 sing for maybe over an hour. You guys are amazing. Today was one of the worst days of my life and I was contemplating suicide but your voices filled me with a peaceful sensation and joy. Thank you. Ana (girl in the pink vest)."

In their Facebook post, Opera Collection writes that it's people and moments like these that motivates them to be artists.

"This is why we sing," the caption reads.

"Music truly has the power to touch people's souls," Cregger adds in the Upworthy article.

The singers have performed "underneath the Port Authority Bus Terminal," on the west side of New York City, The New York Times writes. "They [have] brought Puccini to the Times Square subway, Rossini to the depths of Union Square and Verdi to Pennsylvania Station, where they found a semicaptive audience among the beer-swilling commuters of the Long Island Railroad." 

In the NY Times piece, published earlier this summer, Cassandra Douglas, a soprano in Opera Collective, told the New York Times that the group was simply "contributing to the noise — we're just contributing beautiful noise."

But following the events this week, we think they're contributing something a little more, too.

For more information, visit the Opera Collective's website and Facebook page.

(H/T: Upworthy)