Fake Film Trailer Reveals What's Missing From Most Hollywood Movies

Holding Hollywood accountable.

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It begins like any movie trailer. A young woman becomes heartbroken after her boyfriend breaks up with her. 

But what happens next is something a bit out of the ordinary.

A van pulls up and a group of women kidnap Lola, the young woman. The women, who call themselves the UFC (Underwritten Female Characters), each epitomize typical, oversimplified female stereotypes in movies — and it turns out that Lola is one of them.

"You exist solely so that sensitive men can experience life and explore its infinite mysteries and adventures," one of the UFC women says to Lola.

The UFC women challenge Lola to escape her clichéd characteristics by going to a coffee shop filled with sensitive men in flannel shirts.

"I feel totally broken," the male barista says to Lola. "Can you fix me?"

The trailer for this fictitious movie, Underwritten Female Character, is totally fake, but the message behind it is very real. The video, produced by YouTube channel Nuclear Family, sheds light on the lack of well-rounded female characters in major motion pictures.

A 2015 report from the Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film at San Diego State University found that women comprised only 12 percent of the protagonists from that year's top grossing films and only 30 percent of the speaking characters.

Actresses are standing up against this form of sexism in Hollywood.

"I didn't realize when I was younger that women were written so badly," actress Maisie Williams told Radio Times in 2015, "but going further into this career I realized there are a lot of really bad characters, that it's not common to come across females who aren't just 'the girlfriend.'"

As for the Underwritten Female Character movie trailer, it already has over 130,000 YouTube views as of Monday.

(H/T: Nerdist)