These Women Are Vandalizing Plastic Surgery Ads With Industry-Defying Notes


If you've noticed something strange about plastic surgery advertisements on New York City subway trains recently, you're not alone.

Activists from the #MyBodyDoes grassroots movement have been placing stickers with body positive quotes over these potentially hurtful ads.

"We celebrate the profound uniqueness and inherent value of all bodies," the activists write on their website. "Our focus is on what our bodies can do and how we relate to them, not how they look."

This project and the movement were created by founders Jess Andersen and Ashley Simon in 2015.

"We had this idea to have a body-positive community founded in being informative and inclusive and the stickers are our first project as part of that community," Andersen told MTV News. "I had started thinking about the stickers, having been trapped in a subway filled with terrible advertisements, thinking, 'You know, I really wish I had some way to speak for myself in this space.'"

While Andersen and Simon respect a woman's right to get plastic surgery, they do have a problem with the plastic surgery advertisements.

"The reason these ads in particular are insulting, is because they don't simply advertise plastic surgery as a provided service -- they advertise breast augmentation as a key to happiness," the pair wrote on Facebook. "And while this might be true for some, they also advertise bikini's as something to be afraid of. They sexualize us, reduce us to our bodies, and equate large breasts with our biggest dreams, and small breasts with sadness and inadequacy. Our stickers are not an attack on plastic surgery, they're an attack on exploiting cultural FEAR to manipulate women into buying something that enforces oppressive and patriarchal beauty norms."

Andersen and Simon recently presented their #MyBodyDoes message as part of a New York City exhibition about body expectations. Creative Girls of NYC curated the visual arts exhibition.