With A Train Fast Approaching, Three Men Jumped Onto The Tracks To Help A Stranger

Everyday heroes.

With an incoming train just minutes away, three men fearlessly leapt into action at New York City's City Hall R Station when a man suddenly collapsed and fell onto the subway tracks.

As the New York Times reported, the drama unfolded shortly after 2 p.m. last Friday and was witnessed by Sumeja Tulic, a graduate student who captured the rescue on her cell phone.

According to Tulic, the man, said to be in his 50-60s, was leaning against one of pillars when he suddenly lost consciousness and fell onto the tracks. 

Witnesses say they heard the impact of the man's body as he fell into the narrow corridor of concrete and steel. "I thought someone carrying a heavy duffle bag dropped it on the platform," witness Rachelle Peterson told the Times. 

That's when three men immediately responded to aid the fallen man. "This man waiting for the train called out, 'What was that sound?'" Peterson said. "He ran over, peered over the edge, and immediately jumped onto the tracks."

Tulic described the action to Gothamist. "Without hesitation, 3 men jumped on the subway track and pulled him out. The man was unconscious and bleeding."

Security officer David Tirado, later identified as one of the three heroes, was on his way home when he heard a commotion. "I heard a girl just scream out, 'Oh my God! A man just fell over on the tracks!'" he said in an interview with Gothamist. "And basically I just jumped straight in."  

As the crowd at the station waited for paramedics to arrive, Tulic told the Times that the man's rescuers stayed with him, holding his hand and reassuring him. "They were saying, 'Buddy, you're going to be fine. This was an additional layer of goodness."

The man was transported to Bellevue Hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

Watch the rescue below.

It's always inspiring to see people doing the right thing when circumstances call for action. We applaud these heroes, as well as the first responders and MTA officials who made sure that this commuter was tended to and cared for. 

(H/T: New York Times)