These Gorgeous Animal Chairs Turn Your Home Into A Wild One

We'll take them all.

Artist Máximo Riera is into some pretty wild art. 

Riera's gorgeous Animal Chair Collection features a wide range of animals-turned-chairs, including 3-D sculptures of a rhinoceros, elephant, hippopotamus, beetle, and walrus, to name a few.

According to Riera's studio's website, the work honors the animal kingdom in "an attempt to reflect and capture the beauty of nature in each living thing."

"My philosophy is to stimulate people's [minds], not only with a visual impact from the physical representation but with a message and [an] idea behind every creation," Riera tells A Plus in an email.

Courtesy of http://maximoriera.com/
Courtesy of http://maximoriera.com/

He typically chooses endangered species for his collection to remind people of their uniqueness and importance. 

"This collection gives us an option of admiring what nature is capable of; this is the main reason why from the beginning I wanted to be faithful to the animal's physique and scale," he adds.

Aside from the sheer beauty of the pieces, each hand-finished work is made using a "non-repeatable color code" so that no two pieces are the same. On average, the pieces could take up to 500 hours to create.

Courtesy of http://maximoriera.com/
Courtesy of http://maximoriera.com/

On becoming an artist, Riera, who was influenced by his father, says:

"It can be said that I am a self-made artist with a parallel career in the medical industry throughout my life but I managed to keep art very close to my heart. After selling my company and officially taking my professional retirement, I could concentrate in the creative work which always have been my true passion."

Moreover, Riera is "very grateful" for the experiences he's had in the art industry thus far. His work has been exhibited in four different continents and 10 countries, and he is now further focusing on his Millennial Collection.

Such collection uses "lifeless debris from authentic millenarian olive tree wood found in the South of Spain," Riera explains. "The wood is divided [into] sections with the idea of bringing the sterile material back to life — presenting its essence in a new form but at the same time, respecting its immutable soul."

Courtesy of http://maximoriera.com/
Courtesy of http://maximoriera.com/

Riera says that being a creative person relates to a being sensible one and adds that no matter what one's job is, they should maintain some form of creativity. On a personal level, Riera was also motivated by "the necessity to discover and innovate."

"Being an artist or a designer nowadays means that you don’t have to be afraid to take risks in order to create something new and different," Riera concludes.

And we think his work is proof of that.

Courtesy of http://maximoriera.com/
Courtesy of http://maximoriera.com/
Courtesy of http://maximoriera.com/
Courtesy of http://maximoriera.com/
Courtesy of http://maximoriera.com/
Courtesy of http://maximoriera.com/
Courtesy of http://maximoriera.com/
Courtesy of http://maximoriera.com/
Courtesy of http://maximoriera.com/
Courtesy of http://maximoriera.com/
Courtesy of http://maximoriera.com/
Courtesy of http://maximoriera.com/

(H/T: Mashable)