These Two Artists Explore Human Connections, But Use Very Different Styles In Their Conversation

One artist's work inspired the other — and both are worth taking a closer look at.

Take a look at these two works.

Möbius - photograph printed on canvas, acrylic paint; Image Courtesy Lisa Sette Gallery, Phoenix, Ariz.


Imbalance - egg tempera on linen; Image Courtesy Lisa Sette Gallery, Phoenix, Ariz.

At first glance, you probably wouldn't notice similarities between the works of Luis González Palma and Carrie Marill shown above, but they have a direct connection — their use of patterns and the human experience. 

González Palma's altered photographs in his Möbius series provoke deep emotions and are intended to lure the viewer into the diverse intellectual histories of Latin America. His series uncovers the lives of the indigenous Guatemalans and exposes the emptiness many of them feel from the rest of the world.

"I am interested in the creation of ambiguous images, part figurative and part abstract, part photography and part painting, but in which there is always the search for a spiritual space," González Palma explained to A Plus. "I am interested in thinking and inquiring into the human condition, its limits and emotional possibilities, its solitude and its depth. People have nothing to learn from my models, they can simply feel them, be reflected in them, be them in a symbolic way."

His artistic symbolism and the contrast of his photography and paintings created an opportunity for artist Marill. In order to find a balance, or rather Imbalance — as Marill's series is titled — the Lisa Sette Gallery, where both artists' exhibitions will take place from January 10 to February 25, challenged her to react to Möbius. 

"I was asked by the Lisa Sette Gallery to respond to González Palma's work after she saw a similar use of pattern in both our work," Marill told A Plus. "I am responding formally to the geometric patterning found in his current work and combining it with my interest in hard-edged geometric abstraction found in crystal structures." 

Whereas González Palma’s series aims to create a greater connection between human beings, Marill explores how and if that connection is changing because of man-made advances in our world.

"Some of the formal questions I ask myself in the studio ... 'Is the human touch or gaze changing because of technology?' A human hand created the technology, so how can I tweak those friction points of the handmade and the machine-made, and bring them back around to face one another?" she said. "These questions interest me because I am more comfortable using the intuition in my hands, but find myself relying on technology to realize my works — it's my way of finding intuition in technology."

Check out some of the pieces in González Palma's "Möbius" and Marill's "Imbalance" below:

1.

Möbius - photograph printed on canvas, acrylic paint; Image Courtesy Lisa Sette Gallery, Phoenix, Ariz.
Möbius - photograph printed on canvas, acrylic paint; Image Courtesy Lisa Sette Gallery, Phoenix, Ariz.

2.

Möbius - photograph printed on canvas, acrylic paint; Image Courtesy Lisa Sette Gallery, Phoenix, Ariz.
Möbius - photograph printed on canvas, acrylic paint; Image Courtesy Lisa Sette Gallery, Phoenix, Ariz.

3.

Möbius - photograph printed on canvas, acrylic paint; Image Courtesy Lisa Sette Gallery, Phoenix, Ariz.
Möbius - photograph printed on canvas, acrylic paint; Image Courtesy Lisa Sette Gallery, Phoenix, Ariz.

4. "Ash"

Imbalance - acrylic on Ash wood; Image Courtesy Lisa Sette Gallery, Phoenix, Ariz.
Imbalance - acrylic on Ash wood; Image Courtesy Lisa Sette Gallery, Phoenix, Ariz.

5. "Bass"

Imbalance - acrylic on Bass wood; Image Courtesy Lisa Sette Gallery, Phoenix, Ariz.
Imbalance - acrylic on Bass wood; Image Courtesy Lisa Sette Gallery, Phoenix, Ariz.


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