Louis The Child Just Want To Make People Happy With Their Music

The duo talk playing festivals, manufacturing smiles, and donating to a great cause.

Freddy Kennett and Robby Hauldren of quickly rising EDM duo Louis The Child might be young, but the conviction with which they discuss their identity makes it feel like they've been at this game for a long time. After seeing their first single "It's Strange" take off among EDM fans and famous musicians named Taylor Swift, they began touring last fall and quickly released an "It's Strange" remix package, whose proceeds go directly to micro-lending platform Kiva.

We had a chance to sit down with Kennett and Hauldren at New York's Governors Ball music festival to talk about their style and how they've kept a level head as their profile blows up. As described on their Facebook page, the most accurate genre to attach the pair to is, simply, "happy."

"We just want to make them happy," Kennett said when asked what the pair want fans to take away from their music.

Hauldren nodded in agreement. "Have people leave feeling good, with a smile on their face. Waking up the next day with that smile on their face."

"And the next year, and the year after, forever," Kennett added, laughing. "No ... we make music that's pretty happy ... we kind of say that sometimes [at a show], we'll be like, 'We hope this made you happy today, thank you guys for coming.' "

Hauldren (left) and Kennett (right)

While their pop-infused sound definitely lends itself to feel-good vibes, Louis The Child's mission of positivity actually extends far beyond the music they create. When they sent the "It's Strange" vocal to friends in a wide call for remixes, the result was an influx of tracks Hauldren described as "really, really, cool," but a hard choice in terms of what to include for release.

So to make sure everyone's remix could be heard, they decided to put out all 22 in one package, and even went a step further to donate the profits to Kiva. The platform allows people with aspirations such as building a business, going to school, or making an art installation to secure the funding they need to make their dreams come true.

"We don't really need the money that badly," explained Hauldren. "So why not give it to someone else who can then go do something with it? We can take our money and basically invest in other people's ideas."

"One thing about Kiva that's really cool is that [the borrowers] pay Kiva back, and Kiva gives it out to a new person. It's recycled money," Kennett added.

With huge festivals such as Coachella and Ultra under their belt, an infectious sound built to make listeners happy, and positive action that backs up their words, Kennett and Hauldren are just getting started as Louis The Child. No matter what heights they reach, though, Kennett insists none of it will go to their heads.

"We've always been in the mindset of 'put your head down and work' ... we want to do better."

Check out a snippet of Louis The Child's Gov Ball set below: