Astonishing Miniature Paintings Depict Even The Minuscule Details Of Our Everyday Things

It's barely bigger than your thumb.

"God is in the details."

If this quote had to be accompanied by a picture, it would definitely be one of these incredible drawings. Lorraine Loots, a Cape Town-based miniaturist, creates the tiniest drawings that almost equal the size of a one pound coin: 0,88 inches (2,25 cm).

Her ongoing project, titled Postcards for Ants, started last January and features 365 miniature paintings, one painting for every day in the year. "The project evolved and people started booking sentimental dates making suggestions for the painting to be done on that day," says Lorraine.

Can you believe they're the size of a pencil tip?

To create her intricate masterpieces, Lorraine uses pencils, paint brushes and watercolor.

She renders the miniature drawings with the naked eye.

This bee is probably the smallest drawing Lorraine did so far.

"I decided that I didn't want art to be my "career", but knew that I would need to have a system in place if I still wanted to keep producing art," Lorraine told A+.

She chose to take on a 365-day challenge and spend one hour per day creating an artwork. Funny thing, the only artwork she could finish in such little time was a tiny painting.

After the year has passed, Lorraine admits she didn't want to finish. In Cape Town's designation as World Design Capital 2014, she decided to do it all over again.

Now it takes about 6 hours for her to complete a painting.

The title 'Postcards for Ants' comes from Lorraine being annoyed with everyone suggesting no-one would buy paintings so small.

"People would always ask what I was planning on doing with such tiny pieces. I started to get annoyed with those questions so I would answer that the paintings were made for ants. I guess Zoolander was a subconscious influence," Loots told A+.

The postcards measure at 3,9 x 3,9 in (10 x 10 cm), cost around $27 and can be booked via Lorraine's website.

Watch Lorraine tell more about her fascinating project in this video by Gareth Pon.

(H/T: Lustik)

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