Lena Dunham And Jemima Kirke's Unretouched Lingerie Campaign Is All About Empowerment

Capturing women in their natural environments.

It's not too often we see underwear advertised as being a functional, wardrobe staple, rather than just a sexy luxury item. And while some ads do highlight different bodies in strong, empowering poses, others serve only to objectify the body.

Lonely is a New Zealand-based lingerie label that works in favor of the former, and is all about celebrating women by showing them in their natural, beautiful state. 

And the brand does it without retouching any of the models in their photographs.

For Lonely's latest campaign, the brand enlisted the help of Girls actresses Lena Dunham and Jemima Kirke.

Lonely Girls Project
Lonely Girls Project

An image from the campaign shows Dunham and Kirke casually lounging around, and an outtake from the shoot has Kirke applying lipstick to Dunham. 

Lonely Girls Project
Lonely Girls Project

The pictures are part of the Lonely Girls Project, created by Lonely founder Helene Morris who started the journal series after launching the underwear label in 2009. In the ongoing project, photographers Zara Mirkin and Harry Were capture women wearing Lonely underwear in their own way and in their own environments.

The images look like the photographers have stumbled upon the two women relaxing. Dunham and Kirke are not arranged in sultry poses, nor are they Photoshopped to fit some "perfect" ideal. The images celebrate them for them. This is in keeping with Lonely's ethos. 

Morris describes the label: "For women who wear lingerie as a love letter to themselves."

Dunham and Kirke are a perfect fit for the campaign given that they promote body positive messages. Dunham has been vocal about the use of Photoshop and sexist imagery, and has also used various platforms to promote her body positive messages, including her social media accounts and Lenny Letter.

Dunham and Kirke's images capture their raw, natural beauty, and that is something that is more interesting than any Photoshopped, sexualized image.

(H/T: Nylon)