John Oliver Explains How Internet Jerks Are Ruining Women's Lives Online

Horrifying.

The Internet is a scary place to be a woman, especially if you piss off the trolls that hide behind their screens. While not everyone is going to agree with you online, when men on the Internet — and even some nasty women — don't like what you have to say, the retaliation is especially brutal — and oftentimes threatening. 

Last Week Tonight host John Oliver is known for tackling the tough issues in humorous ways and his segment on online harassment was no different. He addressed how poorly women are treated online — from rape and murderer threats to revenge porn — and how law enforcement is still not yet equipped to deal with it.

His first example: writer Amanda Hess who received death and rape threats so scary and particular from people online who claimed to know where she lived. One that Oliver pointed out read: "@amandahess I am 36 years old, I did 12 years for 'manslaughter,' I killed a woman, like you, who decided to make fun of guys c*cks."

When she told the police, they really didn't know how to handle the situation.

"I'm not even sure [the officer] knew it was criminal," Hess said in an TV interview.

The officer didn't even know what Twitter was.

Men are now also using "revenge porn" to hurt and humiliate women through their nude pictures obtained without consent and shared with their contact information. Oliver brings up one woman's story, in which an ex of hers pretended to be her online, put up nude photos she had sent him in the past, and included the town where she lived and the college where she worked along with it.

But that's not the worst part.

Though nothing immediate seems to be in the works for helping to criminalize online threats, there is a law in the pipeline to help criminalize those who engage in revenge porn. It's called the Intimate Privacy Protection Act. EndRevengePorn.org also collects petition signatures to help criminalize revenge porn as well.

Twitter, Reddit and Google also finally vowed to take online harassment more seriously.

The rest, according to Oliver, comes down to us: "Too often, you hear people play down the dangers of the internet by saying, 'Relax, it's not real life.' But it is — and it always has been."

It needs to stop.