This Guy Illustrates The Faces He Sees In Inanimate Objects

The phenomenon is called "pareidolia."

If you've often looked at inanimate objects, such as a three-prong outlet or a sock with holes in all the right places, and think they look like a face, you have pareidolia. Pareidolia is a psychological phenomenon in which a person looks at or hears something and perceives a pattern where none exists. When we look at a random item and see the pattern of a face (at the very least, two eyes and a mouth), our brains have evolved to quickly connect it to a face. 

"We really want to see things like faces, we really want to hear things like voices, and our perceptual system will set out to do that," Sophie Scott, a neuroscientist at the University College London, told BCC News.  

Many artists have used pareidolia to their advantage by placing hidden images within their work, but musician and illustrator Keith Larsen uses it as the inspiration for each one of his cartoons in his series Faces Within Places. In the series, he uses the inanimate objects he perceives faces in to create characters with backstories to bring them to life. 

He recently created an Instagram page where he shares some of these illustrations and the objects they were inspired by. 

You can check some of them out below. To see the before-and-afters, swipe through each Instagram post. 



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(H/T: Bored Panda

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