This Woman Was Being Harassed, But She Wasn't Going To Take It

Violence against women in India gains more media attention.

Video footage of a woman in India confronting what appears to be a harasser at a train station has gone viral.

The video, originally posted on Chinese website before picking up momentum on LiveLeak, shows an escalating conflict between a man and a woman at a railway station in India. 

The woman appears to be walking away from the argument, when the man raises his hand in, what looks like, a threatening gesture.

The man gets closer as she picks up her purse, and the woman suddenly hits him in the face.

The LiveLeak source's claim that the video is of a wife hitting her husband has not been corroborated by any other outlet yet, and the original video on adds no commentary.

She then picks the man up...

And body slams him.

Meanwhile, passers-by stand around and laugh: No one intervenes to help the woman who ends up struggling with the man on the ground.

Street harassment in India is a regular occurrence.

A 2013 article by the Wall Street Journal reports that although harassment crimes against women can carry sentences ranging from two to five years, at least one public prosecutor couldn't even remember the last time such a case went to trial. 

The report notes that due to cultural taboos, "complainants don't appear in court because they are afraid of tarnishing their family's image or hurting their marriage prospects."

While it's unclear what caused the confrontation, the video has emerged at a time when violence against women in India is in the global spotlight.

Just three days ago, Mukesh Singh, one of five men convicted of raping an Indian student on a moving bus in Delhi in 2012, told British reporters the victim, who later died of her injuries, deserved it.

It's a toxic mentality that must be addressed and uprooted before any kind of real progress can be made when it comes to the issue of violence against women.

Singh is currently appealing his death sentence. 

For resources and ways to support anti-harassment campaigns, please visit Stop Street Harassment.