Healthcare’s New Guard Is Disrupting The Space By Putting Consumers First

SXSW Panel Spotlight

The US healthcare industry has long been maligned for its inaccessibility and unfriendliness towards consumers – and the conventional wisdom has always been that these issues are the inescapable byproducts of a system too unwieldy and complex to change.

Disproving that assumption was the topic of a SXSW session, Radical Healthcare: What do Consumers Want? where several leading healthcare players advocated for policies that will disrupt the status-quo in order to create the best possible outcome for patients.

Panelists and companies represented include Alejandro Foung, Co-Founder and CEO of Lantern, a startup that combines mobile and online tools with remote nudging to support emotional health; Jason Oberfest, Co-Founder and CEO of Mango Health, an app-based program that helps support compliance with medication and improves user outcome; Jennifer Chung, Co-Founder and CEO of Kinsights, an advice-sharing network for parents that touches on a broad spectrum of health and behavioral issues; and Vinnie Ramesh, Co-Founder and CEO of Wellframe, a startup that enables healthcare providers to proactively manage risk where intervention is key to improving clinical and financial outcomes.

The panel kicked off with the question “Would You Rather?”

Alexander Foung asked his fellow panelists if they would rather have a healthcare startup that earned millions, yet offered unproven outcomes for its users, or earn less, but effectively reach customers through targeted, personalized solutions that guaranteed positive, proven outcomes. Unanimously, the panelists agreed on the latter, Arguing that the ultimate goal – and the motivation their ultimate goal and motivation is to help people achieve positive outcomes.

The panelists each emphasized the importance of the balance of technology and human touch, and all agreed that wearables are just the first step in this process. Combine data from wearables with behavioral modification using your smartphone and clinical work, and patient outcomes will inevitably continue to improve over time.

Other examples of companies working to challenge the healthcare space include Oscar, CVS Minute Clinics, and behavioral modification apps that work in tandem with clinical aids for smoking cessation or heart health.

The panelists each emphasized the importance of the balance of technology and human touch, and all agreed that wearables are just the first step in this process. Combine data from wearables with behavioral modification using your smartphone and clinical work, and patient outcomes will inevitably continue to improve over time.

Other examples of companies working to challenge the healthcare space include Oscar, CVS Minute Clinics, and behavioral modification apps that work in tandem with clinical aids for smoking cessation or heart health.