Google Is Making Human Skin For One Very Important Reason

This is going to be a game-changer

Google plays a role in most aspects of our lives. The tech giant has already found its way into our emails, our phones, our YouTube accounts, and even our shopping histories.

And now Google's on the verge of finding its way into our bodies. That's right — our bodies. 

Don't freak out though. It's actually going to be a really good thing, and totally not like a "1984" Big Brother, the-entire-world-is-going-to-end type thing, because Google is developing methods to prevent cancer. 

The magic happens on Google's Mountain View campus in California. 

Journalists from The Atlantic were able to get the first footage inside this health research facility, and what they found were these totally creepy replicas of human hands that look like this: 

No, Google isn't trying to grow a garden of artificial humans. 

Instead, they are using their powers for good by working to create wristbands that can detect cancer cells in a person's blood.

"The central thesis of what we're trying to do at Google Life Sciences is we're trying to change medicine from being episodic and reactive, like 'I go to the doctor when my arm hurts,' to proactive and preventive," says head of Google Life Sciences, Andrew Conrad, in The Atlantic's video above. 

Conrad explains his lab is developing a method to make very tiny particles (AKA nanoparticles) light up when they attach to cancerous red blood cells. The wristband will function like a magnet to attract these lighted nanoparticles.

But before they can create a functioning wristband, Google needs to create human arm model systems to test how light passes through the skin. 

Ya see? Google isn't using human skin in a creepy way after all. 

Watch the video above to learn more about how researchers are testing how light passes through different types of skin so they can build a cancer-detecting device. 

Now it's only a matter of time before Google takes over the world.