Man Crafted A Glass Piano, Left It In A Public Place, And Watched The Magic Happen


Piece by piece, artist Karlis Bogustovs assembled a one-of-a-kind piano to be placed in a public setting for all to play.

It's built from layers upon layers of broken window glass. 

The piano, displayed in London and surrounded by architecture, is quite appropriately entitled "The Sound of Architecture."

"It means that architecture is like music [and] each building is like a song," Bogustovs tells A Plus in an email.

Moreover, architecture provides a different experience for each viewer, much like how music invites a different experience for each listener.

For example, Bogustovs says people who see buildings can consider the way they are built, the people who build them, or the way they function.

Courtesty of Karlis Bogustovs.
Courtesty of Karlis Bogustovs.

"This artwork was a very patient and often quite difficult enterprise," the artist tells A Plus. "I had to quit my job and work for more than four months in order to finish it on time."

But when it was finally installed, people were enthralled by it. 

"They were truly amazed. I really haven't seen anything that would pull people towards it so much in my life."

In a video observing people's reactions with the installment, passersby of all ages stop to play their own tunes. Some children run towards it in awe, while others fervently play the keys to the songs in their heads. 

And some people just listen.

But after a few days, vandals took to the piano and rain soaked the keys away. "People were badly shocked, [but] it was beautiful in some way," Bogustovs says. 

Courtesty of Karlis Bogustovs
Courtesty of Karlis Bogustovs

On his personal inspirations, Bogustovs explains that he grew up with a family of artists and is innately creative.

"I could say that life inspires me. The more vitality I see, the more it urges me to express it. I try to make beautiful things, full with care and patience, because from my point of view, it is something that we lack these days," he says.

"The goal is to slow down a person in a rush and give a sense of wonder."

Courtesty of Karlis Bogustovs
Courtesty of Karlis Bogustovs

In regards to other artists looking to embrace their own aesthetic, Bogustovs has simple, wise advice:

"Be yourself as much as you can. I know that it brings trouble and uneasy situations everyday, but in time you learn not to care and it begins to feel completely awesome."

For what better place "to look for your own aesthetic than in your own being?" he adds.

Courtesty of Karlis Bogustovs
Courtesty of Karlis Bogustovs

Now, Bogustovs plans to pursue works that combine his passion for skateboarding with his love of art with a project called "Glass Skateboarding."

We're pretty certain that whatever he creates next will be beautiful.

Courtesty of Karlis Bogustovs
Courtesty of Karlis Bogustovs

Be sure to watch Bogustovs' videos below:

(H/T: Bored Panda)