George Clooney Says He Hosts Political Fundraisers So One Day We Can Get Money Out Of Politics

Fighting fire with fire.

On Friday, actor George Clooney hosted a fundraiser for the Hillary Victory Fund in San Francisco where entry reportedly cost anywhere from $33,000 to $350,000. While this sort of political fundraiser (with its outrageous ticket prices) is something that Clooney has hosted before, it's also something that he wishes wasn't necessary.

"I think it's an obscene amount of money," Clooney said on NBC's Meet the Press on Sunday. "It's ridiculous that we should have this kind of money in politics."

Clooney added that most politicians probably don't enjoy doing these fundraisers either because "it's not the most fun thing to do," though many representatives might spend four hours daily reaching out to donors.

During Clooney's fundraiser for Hillary Clinton, protesters gathered outside. They showered the Democratic candidate's motorcade with dollar bills and sang "This Land is Your Land."

So if Clooney opposes big money in politics, why does he host these massive fundraising galas?

"The overwhelming amount of the money that we're raising is not going to Hillary to run for president, it's going to the down ballot ticket," Clooney told Meet the Press. "The Supreme Court can overturn Citizens United and get this obscene, ridiculous amount of money out so I never have to do a fundraiser again," he said. "And that's why I'm doing it."

Helping congressional candidates who support campaign finance reform is Clooney's main objective. In fact, one of Clooney's first political fundraising efforts was for another congressional candidate — his father. Although Clooney's dad lost his election 12 years ago, the actor did help raise money for his candidacy by promoting a fake car wash.

While Clooney said that he was a "big fan" of Hillary Clinton, he also praised Bernie Sanders for speaking out against Citizens United.

"The Sanders campaign when they talk about [money in politics] is absolutely right," he told Meet the Press.

Cover image via Matteo Chinellato /