'Female Viagra' Could Finally Be Approved By The FDA This Week

It's called flibanserin.

Good news for women who are trying to get their libidos back. 

The Washington Post reports that the Food and Drug Administration plans to vote on the new "female viagra" drug, fliberanserin, this week. The news comes after Sprout Pharmaceuticals, the company that produced the pill, announced in early June that it received guidance to push the drug through to the FDA. 

Though it's been referred to as the female viagra, the pill doesn't function in the same way. Instead of targeting a body part as viagra does, the pill will attempt to target desire — and help the 1 in 10 U.S. women who reported having low sexual desire want sex in the first place. 

For this reason, the road to FDA approval for fliberanserin has been a long one. 

"Once a host of other common factors for flagging desire are ruled out — medical conditions, sex hormone depletion, relationship troubles, some antidepressants, cultural or religious messages, poor body image — questions remain," reports the Washington Post

But it appears the drug is making headway. 

The drug had failed approval twice before, but a newer study independent of Sprout's (and published by the FDA) revealed that up to 60 percent of women who took the drug saw improvements in their condition. 

The pill works by releasing chemicals that target neurotransmitters in the brain that affect desire. 

"With data in over 11,000 patients to date, we are confident that further supporting the predictable risk/benefit profile of flibanserin will result in women having the first ever treatment for the most common form of female sexual dysfunction," Sprout said in a press release.

Fingers crossed.