Fathers React To Their Daughters Being Catcalled And Let's Just Say... It's Not OK

Let's end this.

85 percent of women in the United States say they experienced street harassment before the age of 17.

That is according to a 2014-2015 Cornell International Survey on Street Harassment for Hollaback!, a non-profit organization that aims to end street harassment throughout the world.

Moreover, 71 percent of the global respondents said they've been followed by harassers. The report also concludes that street harassment adds strong feelings of anxiety, fear, and anger to a woman's everyday life.

"Initial emotions of anger, fear, and anxiety from street harassment show they lead to long term affects of depression and low self-esteem."

This needs to stop, and people must become aware of what's happening.

And in a new video from The Scene, women walk down a street in New York City and are soon catcalled. This, all caught on film, is then shown to their fathers.

Their reactions are telling.

"Our daughters and wives and mothers are to be treated with respect."

"That's upsetting me now. The way he talked — [he had] no shame. Coming on like this, on the street, without even knowing the young lady."

What can we do about it?

Hollaback! says that for starters, we need to open up communication surrounding these issues: "By sharing your story you transform the lonely and isolating experience of street harassment into one that is sharable, and you enter a worldwide community of people who've got your back. Your story will build an irrefutable case as to why street harassment is not OK."

Another organization, Stop Street Harassment (SSH), lists many ways to get involved in the fight, including: reporting offensive campaigns, fundraising, blogging, and donating.

And while SSH explains that there's no single way to deal with a street harassment encounter, you can face them assertively (if safe), report them to police, and more.

Be sure to watch the full video above and share to help put an end to street harassment.