In One Tweet, A Comedian Perfectly Explains The Problem With Trump's Support Of Profiling

Racial profiling is not crime fighting.

As authorities searched for the suspect in the recent bombings in New York and New Jersey, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump doubled down on his support of racial profiling as law enforcement protocol.

"Our local police, they know who a lot of these people are, they are afraid to do anything about it, because they don't want to be accused of profiling," Trump said on Fox and Friends on Monday morning.

He then compared police in the U.S. to their counterparts in Israel.

"Israel has done an unbelievable job and they will profile. They profile. They see somebody that's suspicious," Trump said. "They will profile. They will take that person in and check out. Do we have a choice? Look what's going on. Do we really have a choice? We're trying to be so politically correct in our country and this is only going to get worse."

This is not the first time Trump has openly supported racial profiling. After the shooting in an Orlando nightclub in June, Trump said that profiling was "something that we're going to have to start thinking about as a country."

Racial profiling is largely considered to be ineffective as a tool to combat terrorism. Last year, a Muslim 9th grade student was arrested when a clock that he brought into school was suspected of being a bomb.

Perhaps the most insightful response to Trump's call for expanding racial profiling came from New York-based comedian Hari Kondabolu.

"As a Brown New Yorker post-terrorist attack, I fear terrorism, racial profiling and hate violence. AKA What Black people deal with regularly," Kondabolu tweeted.

While Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton opposed racial profiling last year, an interview in the days after 9/11 reportedly shows that Clinton — serving as a U.S. Senator for New York — did not rule it out as a security measure.

Cover via a katz/Shutterstock.com.