Everyone's Heard About This Mystery Plane Crash — Now We Have A Clue.

Experts have analyzed washed up debris.


On March 8, 2014, Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 mysteriously vanished from the sky, without a word from anyone on board.

Immediately, experts and researchers delved into the mystery of MH370 — trying to calculate its whereabouts, uncover a timeline, and search for evidence.

But it soon became no easy task.

"They lack the four ordinary ways of finding an airplane: primary radar...secondary radar...automated transmissions from the plane to a maintenance base; and oral reports by radio from the cockpit to crew," Matthew L. Wald wrote for the New York Times in the weeks following the crash.

Then came possible and explanations out of Malaysia and from citizens all over the world. Malaysia declared the tragedy was criminal work.

"You look at the facts that you have, and you have to try to make all the pieces fit together," an American investigator said in the report.




Malaysian officials discuss their search-and-rescue strategy for MH370 in 2014.
Malaysian officials discuss their search-and-rescue strategy for MH370 in 2014. Angkatan Tentera Malaysia via Getty Images

As search areas expanded as the investigation continued, more speculation filled the news. Clue were sorted through — results, inconclusive.

On March 18, 2014, another report in the NY Times said that the Chinese ruled out that the plane's disappearance had anything to do with terrorism.

Later, Malaysia's prime minister concluded that the plane had gone down in the Indian Ocean: "Jet Fell Into Ocean With All Lost," the headline read.

But the news wasn't satisfying for all: "The Malaysian government is not telling the truth," a relative of one of the missing shouted, according to The Irish Times.

Since the flight's disappearance, there have been a slew of theories behind the flight's disappearance; speculations tossed around words like "mechanical failure," "suicide," "rapid decompression," and more, according to CNN.

But now, experts say we have a clue.


"The aircraft part that washed up on the island of Réunion last week is definitely from Malaysia Airlines Flight 370," Malaysia's Prime Minister Najib Razak announced in a televised broadcast Wednesday.




"The aircraft part that washed up on the island of Réunion last week is definitely from Malaysia Airlines Flight 370," Malaysia's Prime Minister Najib Razak announced in a televised broadcast Wednesday.



Moreover, officials from Paris say that a conference will be held regarding "analysis operations conducted today within the framework of the disappearance."

Bill Neely at NBC News says that a suitcase has also been found, and it is being analyzed in Paris for DNA.

Following the announcement, photos show relatives of those aboard Flight 370 pushing through officers in front of the carrier's offices in Beijing.

"It brings some sort of closure but not a complete closure," Jacquita Gomes, the wife of a flight crew member, told the Associated Press. "We don't know what happened and where the plane went down."

"It's not over yet."

Members of a youth group deliver roses and prayers for relatives of passengers in March, 2014
Members of a youth group deliver roses and prayers for relatives of passengers in March, 2014 Rahman Roslan/Getty Images

"This is indeed a major breakthrough for us in resolving the disappearance of MH370," Malaysia Airlines said, according to The Wall Street Journal. "We expect and hope that there would be more objects to be found which would be able to help resolve this mystery."

Finally, it’s a piece, quite literally, of concrete evidence. But the mystery remains unsolved.