Credo Is The Cosmetics Store Clean Beauty Aficionados Have Been Waiting For

"Our mission is to change the way people think about what they put on their bodies."

As people continue to care more and more about what they put in their bodies, they've started paying attention to what they put on their bodies as well. 

And if you're someone who wears makeup, that means scrutinizing the ingredient labels on eyeliners, mascaras, and foundations as much as you do your food labels. This process can be time consuming, inconvenient, and confusing — especially when you don't know what to look for. 

That's where Credo comes in.

Similar to big beauty retailers like Sephora and Ulta, Credo is a one-stop-shop for skin, hair, nails, and makeup products. The difference? Credo carefully curates exclusively organic, clean beauty products that don't use any harmful ingredients such as parabens or formaldehyde. 

"When customers get to know us online and in stores, they can expect to find the most comprehensive collection of safe, effective and beautiful products," Shashi Batra, Credo's founder, told A Plus. "Our approach is friendly, inclusive and familiar. We like to be informative and transparent about our mission and why we do what we do."

Credo currently has two brick-and-mortar locations: One in San Francisco and another in New York City that opened this past May. They're staffed with a mix of licensed estheticians and makeup artists who have a comprehensive knowledge of the products they sell. 

Luckily for clean cosmetic aficionados in other cities, Credo's website offers the same support on their online customer service. They also have videos and bios for the brands they sell to help consumers better understand what each one stands for and their origins. 

As for Credo's origins, Batra was inspired by a movement he sees happening in our society.

"People are spending time seeking out brands and products that are good. Good, not just in performance, quality and value, but also in their impact on your health, your happiness and the environment. Contemporary brands like Tesla and Shinola that stand for something, that are emotionally engaging and class leading. Brands that deliver style and substance."

"The more we saw that this was missing in the world of personal care and beauty, the more we believed in making this a destination. With that belief came the Latin name Credo."

If seeing the word "natural" on a product sets off your internal bullshit alarm, you know that the FDA and the USDA have no set rules or regulations for products labeled this way. And, when it comes to the beauty industry, the FDA doesn't pose many restrictions at all. 

To help counteract this issue until the law catches up, pioneers in the clean beauty space have identified harmful ingredients and promote products that don't have a single one in sight. Credo created a list of 23 "dirty ingredients" and promise they'll never stock products that contain them. On their website, they explain what each banned ingredient is and why it's often used in cosmetics and beauty products.

"We hope to be a significant part of the movement to bring more transparency and education in the personal care category to our community," Batra said. "Our mission is to change the way people think about what they put on their bodies. Just as they have done with the natural food category over the last two decades. Given a better choice, we don't believe anybody deliberately would want to live an unhealthy life." 

While many people may appreciate the sentiment behind clean beauty, some may be wary about the effectiveness of the new organic brands on the market. But there are so many options now, you're bound to find healthy cosmetics that actually work for you. 

"When we set about to bring this concept together, we learned that there were well over 150 brands in this space," Batra said. "We have found passionate and determined founders who have created so many beautiful products that really purpose built to be effective and good. They are true pioneers in this space, the 'Estee Lauders' of their generation."

Many of these products are just as effective as the ones currently in your makeup bag except they're better for your health and the environment. 

"We plan to continue to raise awareness and build momentum for this movement in every community we can with a store presence when possible," Batra said. "We will also continue to seek out great products and brands to offer in our stores to fill the gaps where obvious alternatives have not been provided."