When Her Daughter's School Mishandled A Nude Photo Scandal, This Mom Spoke Out

"The problem is not with the girls."

A Melbourne mother is standing up for her daughter and her female classmates after they reportedly felt victimized by their school's draconian dress code.

On Wednesday, Catherine Manning's daughter and the female students at Kambrya College were required to attend an assembly regarding teen boys who were swapping sexual images online.

Kambrya College and more than 70 other Australian schools have been identified as targets of a website that has been exchanging over 2,000 sexual images of teen girls since December. The male students were reportedly encouraged by the website's operators to obtain naked photos of their female classmates.

Assistant principal Jo Wastle told The Age that the school had separate assemblies for the male and female students. But Manning said that the assembly for the female students involved "slut shaming and victim blaming."

According to a Facebook post on Thursday, Manning said the female students were criticized over the lengths of their skirts and told not to post sexy photos online. Manning wrote that she was "mortified" by the school's message to her daughter.

Manning told A Plus that the passion her daughter and her friends showed in response to the lecture is what inspired her to speak out.

"The problem is not with the girls and the length of their skirts, nor whether or not they choose to share photos with their boyfriends or anyone else," Manning wrote on Facebook. "It's with the boys themselves; their sense of entitlement and sexist attitudes towards women and girls, their lack of respect, and the trust they CHOOSE to break."

As of Friday, Manning's Facebook post has received over 11,000 likes.

Female students are more likely to be impacted by strict dress codes than their male counterparts, as evidenced by a Staten Island school where 90 percent of dress code violations were tallied against female students. Many activists have argued that dress codes are a form of slut-shaming that can demoralize female students.

Manning told The Guardian that the school has not yet responded to her complaints, but she offered her own suggestion to fix the overarching issue of boys sharing sexual images online without their subjects' knowledge.

"Stop letting boys off the hook for their appalling behavior," Manning wrote on Facebook. "Address the culture that encourages sexist and misogynist attitudes, but don't demonize our girls."