Her Petition To End Tax On Tampons Was Huge. Here's Why.

"...how can a bodily function be taxed?"

Subeta Vimalarajah started a petition demanding the Australian government to "Stop Taxing My Period!"

Her voice was heard. 

Vimalarajah addressed her petition to Australia's Treasurer Joe Hockey and Prime Minister Tony Abbott, asking that the 10 percent tax on feminine hygiene products be removed. 

The university student in Sydney garnered more than 98,000 signatures to her petition and even had the ear of Hockey himself. 

In a televised episode of the Australian show "Q&A," Vimalarajah posed the following question to Hockey:

 "Mr. Hockey, do you think that sanitary products are an essential health code for half the population?"

After an initial loss for words, Hockey replied, 

"It probably should yes, the answer is yes." 

As cited by Al Jazeera America, Australia's GST is "a broad-based tax of 10 percent on most goods, services and other items sold or consumed in Australia." 

Some products and services are exempt from the GST tax such as some medical, health and care services, precious metals, water, sewerage and drainage and some medical aids and appliances. 

Vimalarajah's argument and the argument of the some 98,000 people who signed the petition is that tampons and pads should be considered "necessary enough" to be GST-free. 

According to Reuters, Hockey released a brief statement following the Q&A saying, "I will write to the states for them to consider the issue ahead of our next meeting in July." 

Vimalarajah stressed in her campaign petition that purchasing pads and tampons aren't for pleasure so, "taxing Australians for getting their period isn't just sexist, it's fundamentally unfair!"

While taxation and government budgeting is a complex issue, Vimalarajah raised an interesting point involving issues that caught the attention of Australia's treasurer and 98,000 people who identified with the campaign to some degree.