Are Name Brands Really Better Than Generic?

Chew on this.

Many of us remember what it was like wanting our moms to buy a box of Kellogg's Froot Loops, only for them come home with a bag of the generic version, called Fruity Hoops or some such nonsense. Our moms always insisted it was exactly the same, but was it? 

What is the real difference between name brand products and generics?

AsapSCIENCE draws back the curtain on generic versus name brands, comparing what goes into these products and how we can know if it's ever really worth it to pay more.

With food, many national brands also produce the same product to sell to private label brands for certain stores. These big companies already have all of the connections with suppliers and infrastructure in place to produce, package, and distribute the product, so it's more practical for store brands to buy directly from the national brand and put their own name on it. 

It's really easier for everyone this way because the national brand sells more of their product, and the store brand doesn't need to invest in resources for manufacturing. The products are usually virtually identical, though the big brand might every-so-slightly tweak the recipe to give it an edge.

Big brands making generic versions doesn't just apply to food; the same is true for liquor, razors, appliances, some beauty products, and clothing. 

And what about medication? Is there actually an advantage to paying more for a trademarked drug?

Check out the video below to find out how generic foods and medications compare to their name brand counterparts:

Looks like our moms were right after all. But as the video also notes, even though generic and name brand products might be nearly the same doesn't mean our brains perceive them that way. 

And while generic medications may be "effectively identical" as name brand medications, that's hardly the end of the conversation. Check out Jeremy Greene's in-depth look at generic medications in The Atlantic