9 Weirdest Things Centenarians Have Claimed As Their Secrets To A Long Life

We'd suggest a healthy pinch of salt to go with that.

While immortality is still out of reach — for now, at least — there are likely more people who've lived past the hundred-year mark today than in any other time in history.

But how some of them managed to do it will truly surprise you. Forget jogging around the block and eating berries — here's how you actually live a long, happy life, according to these (super)centenarians. 

Disclaimer: this should not be taken as actual medical advice.

1. Three beers and a shot of whiskey, daily.

Specifically, "three cans of Miller High Life a day and a good shot of booze at 5 p.m." 

Agnes Fenton of New Jersey, who just turned 110, said that this routine has been a part of her diet since 1943. Her appetite has decreased in recent years, so she isn't allowed to drink very much, but when asked if her caretakers would let her have a shot of Johnnie Walker Blue on her birthday, she replied, "They better."

2. Avoiding men.

Jessie Gallan left home at the age of 13 to become a milkmaid and has never married. When she turned 109 in January, she revealed," My secret to a long life has been staying away from men. They're just more trouble than they're worth."

3. Port wine, olive oil and a sense of humor.

Jeanne Calment was believed to have been the world's oldest person when she died in 1997 at the age of 122. 

Born in 1875 (10 years after President Abraham Lincoln's death), the Frenchwoman met Vincent van Gogh — whom she called "dirty, badly dressed and disagreeable" — took up fencing lessons at 85, still rode her bike at 100 and released a CD, Time's Mistress, at 121, where she reminisced about the past to a rap song and other tunes.

She ate two pounds of chocolate a week and smoked for an alleged 100 years before giving up two years before her death — not because of her health, but because she couldn't see well enough and didn't want anyone else to light her cigarettes for her. She credits her longevity to Port wine, a ton of olive oil and a good sense of humor. "I will die laughing," she said. 

4. Sushi.

Misao Okawa passed a few weeks after celebrating her 117th birthday in April. Last year, she said her secret to a long life was eating sushi and having at least eight hours of sleep. She reportedly ate three large meals a day, every day.

Anything that requires more sushi in our lives is a definite yes in our book.

5. Dr. Pepper.

104-year-old Elizabeth Sullivan says drinking three Dr. Pepper sodas a day is how she managed to live that long. 

At one point, she recalled her doctor telling her to cut down on her Dr. Pepper intake, "but 10 years later he died and I had to change doctors ... I guess the sugar in the Dr. Peppers have kept me alive all this time."

6. A lot of booze.

Pauline Spagnola one-upped everyone else when, at her 100th birthday bash in June, she told the rest of the world that her secret to a long, happy life was "a lot of booze.

7. No sex.

In 2008, Britain's oldest virgin said that she had managed to live so long because she led a full life of celibacy. Then at 105, Clara Meadmore said that she was always too busy for relationships and said physical intimacy was a "hassle."

"I grew up in an era where little girls were to be seen and not heard," she said, "so I had to learn to stand up for myself and earn my own living." You go, girl!

8. Boiled cornmeal, cod and coconut milk.

Perhaps the oldest American veteran in 2003, Puerto Rican Emiliano Mercado del Toro died at 115 four years later. He credited his long life to the traditional Puerto Rican food funche, though his family said it was likely because he never married, despite having been in love twice in his life. 

9. Bacon.

Widowed at 38, Pearl Cantrell has raised seven children, worked as a cotton picker and a hay baler, says bacon is her secret to longevity. The 105-year-old Texan said in 2013, "I love bacon. I eat it everyday."

That makes sense, right?