It's An Iconic '80s Film With Weird Fashion That Every Generation Keeps Discovering

It defined a generation, but there's something in it for everyone.

It's the anniversary of "The Breakfast Club." If you haven't seen this '80s cult classic ... here's your chance.

It's been 30 (gulp) years since "The Breakfast Club" hit the big screen, but if you weren't around the first time, don't worry: It's coming back for seconds. Select theaters around the country will run a two day screening of the film on March 26 and 31. 

Director John Hughes, the "king of '80s film," cast an ensemble of Hollywood's hottest young actors in the flick. They became known as "The Brat Pack.(Not to be confused with Sinatra's Rat Pack.)

The film may have helped define what it felt like to be an angsty member of generation X, but the main theme is relatable to every generation.

It's about being labeled and put in a box. It's about being afraid to show people who we really are because we're afraid of being judged. 

We can all see ourselves in at least one of these characters — even if not in their fashion choices.

Claire (played by Molly Ringwald)

Behind her supposedly "perfect" persona, Claire felt the pressure of her parents' arguing. She felt far from perfect and happy.

John (played by Judd Nelson)

By today's standards, he'd be considered a bully. John exuded an angry, tough outer shell as a way of protecting himself and hiding the fact that he was being abused at home.

Allison (played by Ally Sheedy)

We wouldn't call her a "basket case" today, but she seemed like she was struggling with something. Allison acted a bit strange on purpose, as a way to keep herself isolated and protected.

Andy (played by Emilio Estevez)

Andy was the overconfident, macho, popular jock. Underneath it all, he was consumed with the fear of not living up to his demanding father's extremely high expectations.

Brian (played by Anthony Michael Hall)

We're pretty sure Brian would have a bit of an easier time today. He was a nice, smart guy who got picked on and bullied. Now he'd at least have more resources to stand up to the bullying. 

Also, people are starting to own the word "nerd." Everyone's trying to call themselves one. 

Forced to spend time together, they ended up breaking out of boxes they were put in.

Hughes wanted us to see people as they are beneath the surface. It's something we can relate to today. Because you never know who you might be missing out on.

Check out the trailer below.