Children Explore Assistive Technologies Before Meeting The People Who Use Them Every Day

"I don't really know. Some kind of machine for something?"

Perhaps the most exciting aspect of technology is that it can help improve our everyday lives. 

But while most products function to make life easier, they are often luxuries that are not essential to our overall well-being: Instagram to help us document our lives, a Gmail app to check work on the go, dating apps to make meeting people as convenient as possible.

Other technologies, however, can make vast positive differences in the lives of people in need. Among those tools are technologies created for people with disabilities. Whether it is a bionic arm or leg for an amputee, an iPad app that helps a child with autism communicate, or a technologically advanced wheelchair for a person with paraplegia, these innovations have helped change the lives of thousands of people. 

But many who have no need for assistive technology, often take the worth of such tools for granted or don't even know what they are for. 

In a touching video (above), created by Aktion Mensch — a German organization with a mission to create inclusivity for all and to help people with disabilities live independently —  we get to see through the eyes of children exploring various accessories for people with disabilities. As they sit in a studio, adults ask them to look at a product and try to guess what it is, and what it is used for. 

For the most part, the children have no idea. "I don't really know. Some kind of machine for something?" says one little girl. "You can press something on it?" says another. 

After plenty of guesses, a person is invited to enter the studio to meet the child guessing. That person is someone who uses the assistive technology every day, and they demonstrate to the child how the product works, and how it helps improve their life. 

The moments between the children and people using the technology is touching, and a reminder of how powerful and positive technology can be.