These 5 Movies Are Critically Acclaimed, But Never Got Their Dues From The Oscars

The black-and-white classics that changed the movie game.

It's a fact that not every movie will appeal to every viewer. But it seems that the closest we get to folks agreeing on the caliber of a film are reviews from critics and Academy Award nominations

On the critics' side, website Rotten Tomatoes has attempted to synthesize their reviews with its "Tomatometer." 

"The Tomatometer rating — based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics — is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show," the site reveals.

In fact, the system has led to the creation of a list of the Top 100 Movies of All Time, which theoretically should rank among its tally the cream of the crop among the Oscar nominees. 

But that proved to not be true! A Plus investigated the list and discovered several critically acclaimed films never received a single Oscar nod. 

By today's standards, they may seem corny, but some of them are industry game-changers.

Here are five non-nominated films that surprised:

1. "Modern Times" (1936)

Modern Times is a mostly silent film starring Charlie Chaplin in his famous role as the Little Tramp — and also marked his last appearance as the character. Released after Chaplin's five-year acting hiatus, it faced challenges given that movies with speaking characters had been around for nearly a decade and it was accused of plagiarizing parts of another film. Still, it is hailed as one of Chaplin's best works — charting at No. 4 on the top 100 list — and directly takes a comical stance against industrialism during the Great Depression of the 1930s. 

2. "Repulsion" (1965)

Over the past several years, director Roman Polanski of Rosemary's Baby fame has had much of his career eclipsed by a 1970s sex scandal involving a then-13-year-old girl. But one of his early English-language films, Repulsion, has been lauded for jump-starting the psychological horror genre. Currently at No. 17 on Top 100 Movies of All Time list, Repulsion — a tale of a woman in England who begins to experience delusions — uses minimalist tactics to deliver a game-changing horror flick. 

3. "King Kong" (1933)

At the very least, you'd expect the sci-fi trendsetter to get some sort of visual effects award, especially considering how groundbreaking the stop-motion animation was that brought the giant gorilla to life. But such an award — which was reportedly petitioned to honor King Kong — didn't appear until the 1939 Oscars. Alas, King Kong has instead had to rely on re-releases throughout the '30s, '40s, and '50s, as well as decades-later recognition, to cement its place in movie history, including a No. 20 ranking on Rotten Tomatoes' list.

4. "M" (1931)

The German film predates the first Best Foreign Language Film Oscar, which was handed out 25 years after M was released, but even with a subtitled and English version released in 1933, it failed to attract the Academy's attention. But it will capture you with its crime-driven drama focused on the kidnapping and murder of a child (yikes!), the hunt for the murderer, and pointing the finger of responsibility at parents by encouraging them to look out for their children. Tough stuff, to be sure, for No. 31 on the all-time list of flicks, especially director Fritz Lang's opening scene.

5. "The Night of the Hunter" (1955)

Coming in at No. 39 on the all-time best list is an extremely scandalous tale. How so? Well, it's so morally bad, it involves a reverend who is also a serial killer, and features a seductive bank robber who's zeroed in on a widow in an effort to steal a stashed bank heist. How the two stories overlap is maddening and will leave you on the edge of your seat following every plot twist and turn in this noir classic, which was an unrecognized standout during some of Hollywood's transitional years and been influential to some of the industry's best-known directors.

How many of these have you seen? And do you think they deserved Oscar nods? Let us know in the comments!