Who Are The 2015 Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Inductees?

You can watch the ceremony this weekend.

Are you ready to rock? On Saturday, May 29, you'll get your chance. HBO is broadcasting the 2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction ceremony, which was held in April of this year. The Hall of Fame is honoring eight new members from a range of genres and time periods. Whether you're a fan of punk, blues, classic rock, or something in between, you'll find it in this ceremony. So who are the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees this year? This list is really exciting.

The eight pioneering artists are Ringo Starr, The "5" Royales, The Paul Butterfield Blues Band, Green Day, Joan Jett & The Blackhearts, Lou Reed, Stevie Ray Vaughn & Double Trouble and Bill Withers. To make sure that a group or musician is worthy of being inducted, and that their work has stood the test of time, performers only becomes eligible for the honor 25 years after their first record came out — so we probably won't be seeing any current hit-makers be inducted for some time. Each year, 600 rock experts vote on the newly eligible musicians. Each artist who is inducted must have been chosen by more than 50 percent of the voters.

Clearly, these people are all rock royalty. Let's meet 2015's Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees:

Ringo Starr

The Beatles drummer was already inducted once in 1988 as a member of his iconic band. His induction this year, for his solo work, makes him one of 21 musicians to be honored by the Hall of Fame more than once. Paul McCartney was also inducted as a solo artist in '99.

The "5" Royales

The "5" Royales was one of the first R&B bands, and were hugely influential in the foundation of early American soul music. They recorded most of their hits in the '50s, and many of their songs, including "Dedicated to the One I Love" and "Tell the Truth," were later covered by other artists.

The Paul Butterfield Blues Band

The Paul Butterfield Blues Band formed in '63 at a time when racially-integrated bands were practically nonexistent. The group got its influential sound by mixing blues with a harder rock element, as well as mixing in jazz techniques. The band performed at Woodstock, but broke up in '71.

Green Day

The original pop-punk band, Green Day, has been championing adolescent angst since '86, when singer Billie Joe Armstrong and guitarist Mike Dirnt started playing together, while they were still in high school. Since then, they've gone on to win Grammys, top the charts, and even write a Broadway rock opera based on their album "American Idiot."

Joan Jett & The Blackhearts

A pioneering woman in the male-dominated world of rock, Joan Jett has created some of the most memorable songs of the '80s, including "I Love Rock 'n' Roll." She's also gone on to produce many other female-fronted groups, including Bikini Kill and L7.

Lou Reed

Lou Reed might be best known for founding The Velvet Underground, but he had a substantial solo career as well. His best known song, "Walk on the Wild Side," was released in '73 as a single off his first solo album. Reed is famous for his creative and experimental style, which wasn't always critically popular, but which went on to influence other artists for generations.

Stevie Ray Vaughn & Double Trouble

Stevie Ray Vaughn built his reputation as one of the best blues guitarists in the business over the course of his career, which was tragically cut short when Vaughn died in a helicopter accident at the age of 36. Vaughn and Double Trouble recorded four albums together, which included hits like "Love Stuck Baby," Pride and Joy," and "Texas Flood."

Bill Withers

Though Bill Withers didn't have a tremendously long career, he managed to write some of the best known and most enduring songs of his time, including "Ain't No Sunshine" and "Lean on Me." He contributed to multiple musical genres, including soul, blues, disco, and jazz, as both a vocalist and a songwriter.

The 2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony airs on HBO on Saturday, May 30, at 8 p.m. ET.