'100 Years Of Navajo Beauty' Helps To Raise Awareness For The Dakota Access Pipeline

Cut Video did not miss the opportunity to use their viral platform to help to make a difference.

Cut Video just released their latest installment in their series 100 Years of Beauty — a series of time-lapse videos showing how beauty has evolved in various cultures over time. 

In their newest episode, viewers are shown how beauty trends have changed for Navajos, the Native American people of the Southwestern United States, from the 1910s to the 2010s. Cut Video's Pinterest page lays out the inspiration for each look and some of the research that went into it. 

For instance, in the 1940s, we see how WWII affected Navajos. Both Navajo men and women volunteered for the U.S. service and, as a result, many people left the reservation and the United States for the first time, according to Cut Video. In the video, the model is shown wearing eyeliner, mascara, and bronzer, which is the first visible makeup in the video. Around her neck is a turquoise necklace and her hair is pinned back using a jeweled clip. The model finished the decade's scene by holding up a camera and flashing a big smile. 

With this installment, Cut Video did not miss the opportunity to use their viral platform to help to make a difference. In the video's description is a Change.org petition to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline, a $3.8 billion project that plans to transport 570,000 barrels of crude oil from western North Dakota to Illinois every day. Many people are concerned about this project because it may contaminate the drinking water of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe who lives in the area, as well as damage their ancient burial sites. Back in September, the Navajo Nation voiced their support of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North Dakota protesting the pipeline. Adding a link to the petition on the popular video series helps to raise awareness about the issue and will, hopefully, help the petition reach its goal. 

Watch '100 Years of Navajo Beauty' below:

Learn more about the research behind the looks by watching the video below: